Electrical inspection

Electrical installation conditioning report

You cannot see electricity. Cables are usually hidden inside our walls, and consumer units are often hidden in cupboards, so it is not surprising that we forget to check the condition of our electrical installation for damage or wear and tear.

Faulty and old wiring is one of the main causes or electrical fires in the home. You can reduce the risk of a fire by checking the condition of your cables, switches, sockets and other accessories regularly.

electrician in nottingham 
electrician in long eaton 
registered electrician 
landlords electrical inspection
typical installation dating back to the 1980s

How old is my electrical installation?

Clear signs that can help you tell the age of equipment in the electrical installation in your home include:

  • Fixed cables coated in black rubber (stopped being used in the 1960s).
  • Fixed cables coated in lead or fabric (used before the 1960s).
  • A fuse box with a wooden back, cast iron switches, or a mixture of fuse boxes (used before the 1960s).
  • Older round pin sockets (or light switches), braided flex hanging from ceiling roses, brown (or black) switches, or sockets mounted in or no skirting boards (used before the 1960s).
  • Light switches on the walls or in bathrooms (used before the 1960s).

However old your electrical installation is, it may get damaged and will suffer from wear and tear. So you should get an electrician to check its condition at least every 10 years or when you move into a new property.

What is the aim of a condition report?

The five main aims of a condition report are:

  1. Record the results of the inspection and testing to make sure the electrical installation is safe to be used until the next inspection (following any work needed to make it safe)
  2. Find any damage and wear and tear that might affect safety, and report it
  3. Find any parts of the electrical installation that do not meet the IET Wiring Regulations
  4. Help find anything that may cause electric shocks and high temperatures
  5. Provide and important record of the installation at the time of the inspection, and for inspection testing in the future.

 Types of condition report

 In general, there are two types of domestic electrical installation condition report:

  • Visual condition report – this does not include testing and is only suitable if the installation has been testing recently.
  • Periodic inspection reports – this is what we would normally recommend, as it tests the installation and would find any hidden damage.

            And EICR is like an mot for your home electrics it start with a visual inspection that give me a quick indication in to the condition of sockets switches and wiring that can be seen. Also all of the switches and sockets within your home will be removed to check this condition. A full test on the whole installation will be carried out ensuring cabling is safe the correct size and fit for purpose.

            Your EICR report will grade the findings with the following code

C1 – IMMEDIATE DANGER

C2 POSSIBLE DANGER IF LEFT

C3 IT IS RECONMENDED THAT YOU RECTIFIE THIS

It is recommended that at a minimum that c1 and c2 are completed to obtain a satisfactory certificate

We will provide you with following after completing your

  • A 3 part comprehensive report on the current snapshot condition of your electrics
  • A written quotation for any necessary works needed to be carried out to improve your safety
  • Guarantee of works for 7 years
  • Peace of mind knowing that your electrics have been checked to a professional standard

Protect you and your family from unsafe electrics with an Electrical Survey for just £100.00. Call Adam a Professional Electrical Inspector on 07477167510 to book yours in today.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: